Tag: facebook

Facebook Messenger broken : May take hours to resolve

Users from various parts of the world complained that social network is not working and they are unable to connect. Might be because of Thanks giving and Black Friday overwhelming deals causes this crash of messenger app.

Messenger broken once again

However authorities admitted that the issue has been recorded and most probably due to some tech issue

Frustrated Messenger users from the US to the UK have reported that they are unable to access the service this afternoon.

Facebook’s main site also appears to be affected by the outage, though not as severely as the standalone chat app.

Facebook has confirmed the issue on Twitter, responding to users complaining about the issue.

In one tweet sent just after midnight this morning, Facebook wrote: “We’re aware of the issue and we’re working on a fix.”

However, a fix doesn’t seem to have been rolled out yet. There’s no new version of Facebook Messenger available to download on the Apple App Store or Android Google Play Store beyond v.170.

And users are still complaining well into the afternoon today.

In a statement given to The Sun, a Facebook spokesperson said: “We are aware of the issue and are working on a fix.”

Have you experienced any issues with Facebook Messenger lately? Let us know in the comments!

It comes just days after Facebook suffered a ‘total blackout’ that affected the social media site and its other platforms, including WhatsApp and Instagram.

Messenger users in Europe were hit hardest by the outage, though issues were also reported along the US West Coast
Messenger users in Europe were hit hardest by the outage, though issues were also reported along the US West Coast

Most users (49 percent) reported they were unable to connect to the server on Monday afternoon.

Many also indicated that they were having trouble receiving messages (28 percent), while others said they could not log in at all (22 percent).

The app appears to have crashed shortly after 3 p.m. (ET), with thousands of reports streaming in before 3:30.

Messenger users in Europe were worst affected by the issue Monday afternoon, with a majority of reports coming from the UK, Ireland, Poland, Belgium, and Denmark.

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50 million accounts impacted by major mistake: Security breach, Company accepted

A million hacked Facebook accounts aren’t cool. You know what’s even less cool? Fifty million hacked Facebook accounts.

A Friday morning press release from our connect-people-at-any-cost friends in Menlo Park detailed a potentially horrifying situation for the billions of people who use the social media service: Their accounts might have been hacked. Well, at least 50 million of them were “directly affected,” anyway.

You’ll have to log back in to Facebook as a result – that includes any apps that you might log into with Facebook, like Spotify.

“On the afternoon of Tuesday, September 25, our engineering team discovered a security issue affecting almost 50 million accounts,” said Facebook’s Guy Rosen.

We’re taking this incredibly seriously and wanted to let everyone know what’s happened and the immediate action we’ve taken to protect people’s security.”

According to Facebook, attackers exploited a vulnerability in the website’s code.

It specifically impacted “View As”, which is a feature that lets you see what your own profile looks like to someone else.

Hackers used this feature to steal Facebook’s access tokens.

Access tokens are like digital keys that keep you logged into Facebook – so you don’t have to re-enter your password every time you use the app.

This means that hackers would’ve been able to access your Facebook account, potentially giving them access to your entire profile, your private messages and more.

“This attack exploited the complex interaction of multiple issues in our code,” Facebook admitted.

“It stemmed from a change we made to our video uploading feature in July 2017, which impacted ‘View As.’

“The attackers not only needed to find this vulnerability and use it to get an access token, they then had to pivot from that account to others to steal more tokens.”

Has Facebook fixed the problem?

Facebook says it has “fixed the vulnerability”, and told law enforcement about the issue.

The world’s largest social network has also reset the access tokens for the 50million accounts that Facebook admits were affected.

Facebook is also resetting access tokens for another 40million accounts that have been subject to a “View As” look-up in the last year – as a precautionary measure.

This means that roughly 90million users will be logged out of Facebook, and any apps linked to Facebook.

When you log back in, you’ll see a notification at the top of your News Feed explaining what happened.

Facebook has also temporarily turned off the “View As” feature so it can “conduct a thorough security review”.

What Roma tweeted Mohamed Salah after he reached CL final with Liverpool is pure class

Liverpool reached the Champions League final on Wednesday night thanks to a 7-6 aggregate victory over AS Roma.

Jurgen Klopp’s side lost the second leg 4-2 at the Stadio Olimpico but still progressed to the final thanks to their 5-2 win at Anfield last week.

Salah, who scored twice and provided two assists in the first leg, failed to get himself on the scoresheet back at his former stomping ground.

However, he did receive an incredibly classy tweet from Roma’s Twitter account shortly after the final whistle.

ROMA’S TWEET TO SALAH IS CLASS

The Italian outfit tweeted a drawing of the 25-year-old in a half-Roma, half-Liverpool shirt alongside the words: “It hurts so much that #ASRoma’s incredible dream of going all the way to Kiev is over but you’ll be there in your new colours. Good luck in the #UCL final @MoSalah #ForzaRoma #YNWA”

That tweet deserves a lot of respect.

 Everybody associated with AS Roma was understandably devastated after the final whistle, but their English-language Twitter account still took the time to send that tweet.

Liverpool fans were full of praise for Roma, whose tweet will help to further strengthen the relationship between the clubs.

Facebook is trying this feature in the following countries now

Facebook is moving few steps out of its domain to see customers reviews on its new feature which gives an option to viewers to show there despise on post or status. The social network in February first started testing a downvote option with a small number of users. Now, Facebook is making that option more widely available.

Facebook is trying out a voting system for public posts which would allow users to “down vote” comments. After trialing the up vote/down vote buttons on a handful of users earlier this year, “the company has made the feature widely available in Australia and New Zealand for the time being, in what appears to be some sort of advanced-stage test”, BGR reports.

As part of a test in New Zealand and Australia, Facebook is testing using up votes and down votes as a signal when ranking Page post comments.

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 In a statement to PCMag, the social network confirmed it’s currently “running a test that introduces an upvote and downvote action for comments on large public Page posts.” The company started testing this a few weeks ago with certain Pages in New Zealand and recently expanded it to a few more in Australia. Facebook acknowledged it’s using these votes as a signal when ranking comments.

“Public discussions are an important part of Facebook, and people have told us they want more ways to make sure those discussions are constructive – even when people might disagree with each other,” a Facebook spokesperson said in an email. “Facebook is a place for free expression, but we also recognize that there should be a way for people tell us and each other which comments are most thoughtful and useful.”

Day:2 Zuckerberg responded To Senators amid worst privacy crises in the history of Facebook

Facebook Inc. Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg, in prepared testimony for the U.S. House of Representatives, said all of Facebook’s problems are his mistake.

The world’s largest social-media company didn’t do enough to prevent its tools from being used for harm, especially in terms of fake news, foreign interference in elections, hate speech, developer policies and data privacy, Zuckerberg, Facebook’s co-founder, said.

“It was my mistake, and I’m sorry,” Zuckerberg added, according to a copy of the prepared testimony ahead of his appearance in front of the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Wednesday. “I started Facebook, I run it, and I’m responsible for what happens here.”

Zuckerberg is due to testify to Congress on Tuesday and Wednesday in the midst of the worst privacy crisis in Facebook’s history. He will try to explain how much Facebook contributes to the world, while saying he didn’t take a broad enough view of the consequences the company’s technology.

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I am going to be careful: Zuckerberg’s told Congress commits better privacy

“As Facebook has grown, people everywhere have gotten a powerful new tool to stay connected to the people they love, make their voices heard, and build communities and businesses,” Mr. Zuckerberg says, in prepared testimony released by a House committee on Monday. “But it’s clear now that we didn’t do enough to prevent these tools from being used for harm as well.”

“There are going to be people who are going to say Facebook ought to be broken up,” Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR) said recently. “There have been a number of proposals and ideas for doing it, and I think unless [Zuckerberg] finds a way to honor the promise he made several years ago, he’s gonna have a law on his hands.”

Image result for zuckerberg say sorry

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder and CEO of social media platform Facebook, is slated to testify before Congress for the first time on Tuesday, April 10, for his company’s failure to protect user information. It will be the first of two back-to-back appearances the executive will make this week — the first will take place before the joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees, and on Wednesday, Zuckerberg will testify in front of the House Energy and Commerce Committee. It won’t be easy, given the temperament in Congress.

The legislature has released the entrepreneur’s prepared testimony ahead of his Wednesday hearing, in which Zuckerberg concedes that Facebook was “too slow to spot and respond to Russian interference” during the 2016 election.

“We face a number of important issues around privacy, safety, and democracy, and you will rightfully have some hard questions for me to answer,” begins Zuckerberg’s statement. “Facebook is an idealistic and optimistic company,” the statement reads. “For most of our existence, we focused on all the good that connecting people can bring. As Facebook has grown, people everywhere have gotten a powerful new tool to stay connected to the people they love, make their voices heard, and build communities and businesses.” Indeed, the social network has been crucial in helping individuals organize — it played a large role in disseminating the #metoo movement, has helped raise funds for Hurricane Harvey relief, and also help organize the March for Our Lives demonstration.

China mostly banned Silicon Valley companies because of this reason

In such a tech era where everything is pinching towards digital medium, one cannot even imagine living life without websites such as Google, Youtube, Netflix or Twitter, China has banned all such foreign companies.

Ever since the Chinese Government banned Facebook in 2009, Mark Zuckerberg has been making annual trips there attempting to persuade its leaders to let his company back in. He learned Mandarin and jogged through the smog-filled streets of Beijing to show how much he loved the country. Facebook even created new tools to allow China to do something that goes against Facebook’s founding principles — censor content.

But the Chinese haven’t obliged. They saw no advantages in letting a foreign company dominate their technology industry. China also blocked Google, Twitter, and Netflix and raised enough obstacles to force Uber out.

Image result for silicon valley

Chinese technology companies are now amongst the most valuable — and innovative — in the world. Facebook’s Chinese competitor, Tencent, eclipsed it in market capitalization in November, crossing the $500 billion mark. Tencent’s social-media platform, WeChat, enables bill payment, taxi ordering, and hotel booking while chatting with friends; it is so far ahead in innovation that Facebook may be copying its features. Other Chinese companies, such as Alibaba, Baidu, and DJI, are racing ahead in e-commerce, logistics, artificial intelligence, self-driving cars, and drone technologies. These companies are gearing up to challenge Silicon Valley itself.

The protectionism that economists have long decried, which favors domestic supplies of physical goods and services, limits competition and thereby the incentive to innovate and evolve. It creates monopolies, raises costs, and stifles a country’s competitiveness and productivity. But this is not a problem in the Internet world.

china chip

Over the Internet, knowledge, and ideas spread instantaneously. Entrepreneurs in one country can easily learn about the innovations and business models of another country and duplicate them. Technologies are advancing on exponential curves and becoming faster and cheaper — so every country can afford them. Any technology company in any country that does not innovate risks going out of business because local startups are constantly emerging that have the ability to challenge them.

Chinese technology protectionism created a fertile ground for local startups by eliminating the fear of foreign predators. And there was plenty of competition — coming from within China.

Silicon Valley’s moguls openly tout the need to build monopolies and gain an unfair competitive advantage by dumping capital. They take pride in their position in an economy in which money is the ultimate weapon and winners take all. If tech companies cannot copy a technology, they buy the competitor.

Amazon, for example, has been losing money or earning razor-thin margins for more than two decades. But because it was gaining market share and killing off its brick-and-mortar competition, investors rewarded it with a high stock price. With this inflated capitalization, Amazon raised money at below market interest rates and used it to increase its market share. Uber has used the same strategy to raise billions of dollars to put potential global competitors out of business. It has been unscrupulous and unethical in its business practices.

Though this may sound strange, copying is good for innovation. This is how Chinese technology companies got started: by adapting Silicon Valley’s technologies for Chinese use and improving on them. It’s how Silicon Valley works too.

Steve Jobs built the Macintosh by copying the windowing interface from the Palo Alto Research Center. As he admitted in 1994, “Picasso had a saying, ‘Good artists copy, great artists steal’; and we have always been shameless about stealing great ideas.”

Apple usually lags in innovations so that it can learn from the successes of others. Indeed, almost every Apple product has elements that are copied. The iPod, for example, was invented by British inventor Kane Kramer; iTunes was built on a technology purchased from Soundjam, and the iPhone frequently copies Samsung’s mobile technologies — while Samsung copies Apple’s.

Facebook’s origins also hark back to the ideas that Zuckerberg copied from MySpace and Friendster. And nothing has changed since Facebook Places is a replica of Foursquare; Messenger video duplicates Skype; Facebook Stories is a clone of Snapchat, and Facebook Live combines the best features of Meerkat and Periscope. Facebook tried mimicking Whatsapp but couldn’t gain market share, so it spent a fortune to buy the company (again acting on the Silicon Valley mantra that if stealing doesn’t work, then buy).

China opened its doors at first to let Silicon Valley companies bring in their ideas to train its entrepreneurs. And then it abruptly locked those companies out so that local business could thrive. It realized that Silicon Valley had such a monetary advantage that local entrepreneurs could never compete.

America doesn’t realize how much things have changed and how rapidly it is losing its competitive edge. With the Trump administration’s constant anti-immigrant rants, foreign-born people are getting a clear message: Go home; we don’t want you. This is a gift to the rest of the world’s nations because the immigrant exodus is boosting their innovation capabilities. And America’s rising protectionist sentiments provide encouragement to other nations to raise their own walls.