Tag: trump

Help us in getting them on table: Trump in letter to Imran Khan

Not too long ago when Trump had a different views about its strategic partner in Asia and he blamed Pakistan for not doing anything against the dollars in aid given to Pakistan. In reply to which Newly resumed premier without waiting instantly replied his tweets and asked Trump to rectify his records.

Though Pakistan Premier is criticized for making his thoughts so frequently and instantly but this time Trump copied him and took a U Turn

However Pentagon never second Trump view point and stated Pakistan as critical strategic partner in this region. In span of around 3 weeks Trump wrote a letter to Pakistan Prime Minister and here is what he has said:

US President Donald Trump on Monday has written a letter to Prime Minister Imran Khan, seeking Pakistan help to bring Taliban leadership on the negotiation table.

According to the media reports, Prime Minister Imran, in a meeting with TV anchors and reporters in Islamabad, informed that he received a letter from the US president earlier today, sought Pakistan’s help in solving Afghan mess.

In the letter, the US president has asked Pakistan to play its role in Afghanistan peace talks which are aimed to end the 17-year invasion of Afghanistan by US troops.

It is pertinent to mention here that on November 19, US President Donald Trump defended his administration’s decision to stop hundreds of millions of dollars in military aid to Pakistan, saying the country does not do “a damn thing” for the US and its government had helped Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden hide near its city.

Prime Minister Imran Khan hit back at President Donald Trump’s statement and said,”Record needs to be put straight.”

PM Imran also asked Trump to stop making Pakistan a scapegoat and “do an honest assessment of why, despite 140,000 NATO troops plus 250,000 Afghan troops and reportedly $1 trillion spent on the war in Afghanistan, the Taliban today are stronger than before.”

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Pakistan’s PM Imran Khan told Trump to rectify his records: Aid was nuts

In the latest hot tweets exchange between TRUMP and Pakistan PM Imran Khan, world has observed entirety different attitude from underestimated country like PAKISTAN. Not only Trump but none of his cabinet was expecting such a instant and blunt response on twitter just in few mins after Trump put on his tweet. This made them realize the insight of Khans regime in PAKISTAN. On the other hand Pentagon without a moment longer than necessary got on spot and recorded their verdict which was inverse of the President. Pentagon clearly confessed Pakistan is still a critical and supportive ally in the region

Trumps in his media talk point out Pakistan role against the aid given was not enough. I am not satisfied with the response hence halt the aid $1.3 billion.

In response to Trumps media talk, in just short of few minutes Newly elected Prime Minister Imran Khan replied in his tweet that they lost 75000 people lives and $123 billion however in return we just got $20 billion which is nuts.

He also told clearly that we wont be a part of any ones war at the same cost anymore. We will have our own interest on the top and anything like “Do More” will be rejected at earliest

Reason why PM Imran Khan has reacted so furious and angrily?

He has a serious concern over post effect of war against terror the lives they have lost and the economy destruction is irreplaceable. On the other hand one should not forget that Pakistan is no more dependent on US financial aid. They have got various sources that are keen to pour in Pakistan’s economy in an hour of need. Countries like China , KSA, UAE , Malaysia, Turkey and many more holds keen interest in Pakistan due to its CPEC project and they strongly believe Gawadar is future Dubai.

So in such scenarios where many countries are interested to help the drowning economy why would the PM like Imran Khan would beg for nuts?

Noah’s thinks President Trump & PM Imran Khan share dupe attributes

South African comedian Trevor Noah has compared Pakistan’s would-be prime minister Imran Khan to US President Donald Trump, stressing that the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) chief’s background story was “unnervingly similar” to that of Trump’s, wherein the two belonged to privileged families and were known for their good looks.

In the latest episode of Noah’s show, the comedian compared Pakistan’s Prime Minister-elect, Imran Khan to the US President Donald Trump. Noah stressed that Khan’s background story is eerily similar to that of Trump’s, wherein the two belonged to privileged families and were known for their good looks.

In a throwback interview presented on the show, Khan describes his lavish lair to “not be that lavish” after all. Instead, he says that he has tried to make it “comfortable” for himself. Noah then points out at a picture of Khan’s old bedroom that he believes is a “part of Pakistan’s Trump Tower”.

Calling Khan an “even more tan version of Trump,” the 34-year-old TV host added that media outlets portray Khan and Trump similarly as well. One clip from the show features a political commentator stating that Khan seems to contradict himself during speeches — something the US President has also often been accused of.

Noah also went ahead to compare Trump and Khan’s career choices, stating that “while was Trump was doing pizza ads, Khan was promoting Pepsi”. Noah joked, “Trump has three marriages in the tabloid, so did Khan. Trump thinks Islam is bad, Khan lives is Islamabad.”

He also pointed out that shortly before the two were elected in their respective countries, they were both embroiled in sexual harassment scandals. Noah also spoke of the similarity of words in Trump’s and Khan’s interviews.

Noah concluded with yet another joke, saying, “I don’t know if Prime Minister Khan will turn out to be exactly like President Trump. All I’m saying is that if you’re planning to move to Pakistan to escape Trump, you might want to pick some place else.”

How can plunging Lira impact EU market: EU spokesperson

EU spokes person Christian told: We have formed a commission who has taken this charge to monitor whatever is happening with Lira and also its sudden sharp decline. We are aware of all possible facts and outcomes and we are in a state of observation as most of the banks in Turkey are owned by European or Middle Eastern investors. So there is a possibility that this turmoil could impact European markets.

We don’t want to engage in speculations on what will happen on the migration front,” Spahr said

What Erdogan urge to Turks:

This weekend Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan called on Turks to help support the lira by selling their dollars and euros. “If there are dollars under your pillow, take these out,” he told supporters at a rally in the northeastern Turkish town of Unye. 

Consecuencias del Brexit

How this all happened with Lira:

Now, the lira has plumbed new depth, after US President Donald Trump confirmed on Friday that he had approved the doubling of tariffs on Turkish steel and aluminium following the detention in Turkey of US evangelical pastor Andrew Brunson on terrorism charges. 

What does this mean for the world?

Experts have warned that this may not be a localised crisis. This morning other emerging market and high-yielding currencies tumbled across the board, “despite the fact Turkey accounts for just one percent of the world economy”, The Daily Telegraph reports.

The crash saw European markets fall sharply when markets opened, particularly in countries with banks exposed to the Turkish currency, such as Spain’s BBVA, Italy’s UniCredit and France’s BNP Paribas. On Friday, the FTSE fell 75 points, while Germany’s Dax ended the day down 2%.

Reuters reports that emerging market currencies continue “to reel as investors worry about contagion”, exemplified by the South African rand, which dropped 3.1% this morning, while the Russian rouble dropped 0.8% and the Mexican peso 1.5%.

Elsewhere, the euro fell to as low as $1.1365, a 13-month low, before recovering to trade down 0.2% to $1.1382. The dollar, which has rallied in the Turkish lira crisis, gained 0.1% to 96.463 against a basket of major currencies, Reuters adds.

The yen surged 0.6% to 110.265 after earlier hitting a six-week high of 110.11, and the Swiss franc rose 0.5% to $1.1288

 

 

 

 

 

Headlines to start your Day

 

Here is what you need to know on Tuesday

• Fears of a global contagion.

Turkey’s currency hit another record low, dragged down by soaring inflation, economic mismanagement and tensions with the U.S. There are growing fears of an impending economic meltdown that could spread to other emerging economies.

The plunge of the lira hit stocks in Asia and Europe, and played havoc with currency markets. The Indian rupee dropped to a record low against the dollar; the Indonesian rupiah flirted with a three-year low.

China’s main stock index lost nearly 2 percent at one point on Monday, but largely recovered. In Tokyo, the main index closed 2 percent lower. Stocks in Seoul fell 1.5 percent. European markets fared only slightly better. U.S. markets dipped but didn’t sag..

Beijing also further weakened its currency, the renminbi, against the dollar, setting the benchmark rate for trading in Shanghai at its weakest level in 15 months.

 

Carlos Barria/Reuters

• President Trump signed a defense-spending bill named in honor of Senator John McCain — without once mentioning Mr. McCain — at Fort Drum Army Base in New York.

The bill authorizes $717 billion for military funding over the next year. Mr. Trump called it the most significant investment in the military in modern history.

As is often the case, there were many threads to follow in news related to the president.

Peter Strzok, the F.B.I. senior counterintelligence agent who disparaged Mr. Trump in text messages, was fired for violating F.B.I. policies. He helped oversee the Hillary Clinton email and Russia investigations.

And as the fraud trial of Paul Manafort enters its second week, Times reporters looked back at his lobbying career.


Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

• “There is no such thing as re-education centers.”

China on Monday flatly denied accusations from U.N. experts that it had detained more than a million ethnic Uighur Muslims in re-education camps in its western Xinjiang region. The denial came after a U.N. official last week spoke of Xinjiang becoming “something resembling a massive internment camp,” with mass detention and disappearances.

But China stood firm: A senior Chinese Communist Party official said the country’s ethnic minorities lived in peace and contentment enjoying freedom of religious belief. Above, Chinese military police at a rally in Xinjiang, last year. Beijing has progressively tightened security in the region.


Reuters

• In Afghanistan, after four days of fighting, the Taliban appear to control most neighborhoods in the city of Ghazni. They have also taken over most of the province’s rural areas.

That raises the prospect that if the insurgents do fully take the city, they may be in a position to control an entire province for the first time in the 17-year war in Afghanistan.

• “besity in our monks is a ticking time bomb.”

Buddhist monks are at the front lines of a fight against obesity in Thailand, which is the second-heaviest nation in Asia, after Malaysia. A study found that nearly half of Thai monks are obese, more than 40 percent have high cholesterol, nearly 25 percent have high blood pressure and one in 10 are diabetic.

But the monks consume fewer calories than the general population, and are forbidden to eat after midday. Researchers found one major culprit: To keep their energy up, many monks rely on highly sweetened beverages, including sugary drinks.

Business

Kiichiro Sato/Associated Press

• Elon Musk offered a fuller explanation of his “funding secured” Twitter post on Aug. 7 about taking Tesla private. He said, among other things, that he had held meetings with representatives of a Saudi sovereign wealth fund who expressed an eagerness to help him take the electric-car maker private.

• Biometrics beyond fingerprints: To fight fraud, some large banks and retailers are amassing tens of millions of profiles that can identify customers by how they touch, hold and tap their devices.

• Independent music labels called on European antitrust regulators to block Sony’s $2.3 billion bid for control of EMI, saying the merger would give the Japanese conglomerate too much market power.

• Most U.S. stocks were lower. Here’s a snapshot of global markets.

In the News

Ritchie B Tongo/EPA, via Shutterstock

• In Taiwan, a fire raged through a floor of Taipei Hospital filled with elderly patients, killing at least nine people and injuring two dozen more. [The New York Times]

• Aretha Franklin, 76, the legendary “Queen of Soul,” is gravely ill, family members told a Detroit news outlet on Monday. [Variety]

• The U.S. is set to return three church bells to the Philippines that were taken as war trophies 117 years ago. Their ringing set off the worst U.S. defeat in the Philippine-American war and spurred retaliation that left thousands dead. [The New York Times]

• President Moon Jae-in of South Korea will visit Pyongyang next month for his third summit meeting with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un. [The New York Times]

• A Swedish doctor visited Gui Minhai, the Hong Kong publisher who has been held by Chinese authorities off and on since 2015, when he was abducted in Thailand. [Reuters]

Smarter Living

Tips for a more fulfilling life.

Lars Leetaru

• How to enjoy nature on your next urban getaway.

• Five cheap(ish) things for every college dorm.

• Recipe of the day: Keep pasta simple: Zucchini, good ricotta and basil will do the tri

• The top of Mt.

Fuji is one of the few places in Japan where a postmark is still more coveted than a “like” on Instagram or Facebook. But hauling all that mail down takes effort, even in the absence of snow. That’s where the bulldozer comes in.

• In memoriam: Bui Tin, 90, a North Vietnamese colonel who accepted the surrender of South Vietnam in 1975, but who later fled Vietnam and became a critic of its ruling Communist Party. And mourners mobbed the funeral of Ellen Joyce Loo, 32, a singer-songwriter and advocate of LGBT rights in Hong Kong who suffered from bipolar disorder.

• And cautious hope for hemophiliacs. After trying for decades to develop a gene therapy to treat hemophilia, the inability to form blood clots, researchers are starting to succeed.

Back Story

Twentieth Century Fox

It’s just a jump to the left, and then a step to the right. Put your hands on your hips, and bring your knees in tight.

But as fans of the “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” well know, it’s the pelvic thrust that really drives you insane. The cult classic film opened in London on this day in 1975.

Often described as a campy take on horror and science fiction films, the movie originally premiered on the London stage in 1973, and was summed up in one breathless sentence by a Times review: “Two young innocents are entrapped by Frank N. Furter, a mad, transvestite inventor from outer space, who has created a beefcake monster, Rocky Horror, who looks as though he has just stepped from the centerfold of Playgirl.”

Shortly after the premiere of the film version, it was briefly shelved before being resurrected at a midnight screening in New York. A group of fans made weekly pilgrimages to the small theater, sat in the front row and screamed for their favorite characters. A social phenomenon was born, and the film has remained in theaters ever since.

Audience participation, props and costumes are widely encouraged at regularly scheduled screenings around the world.

We’ll end with the words of Frank N. Furter: Don’t dream it. Be it.

Remy Tumin wrote today’s Back Story.

_____

This briefing was prepared for the Asian morning.

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Trump got the most eccentric response from Britishers: May

 

The president savaged Mr May’s Brexit proposals and warned they would likely kill off any chance of a future trade deal with the US in a bombshell interview.

He also backed former Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson for PM, and launched a fresh attack on Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.

As he was due to meet the Queen today, thousands of people descended on central London for a women’s march and a ‘Stop Trump’ protest calling for people to “build bridges not walls.”

During his state visit to London, May told BBC what Trump has a trick for her to deal with EU and it was astonishing. Trump told May not to walk away from negotiations but sue them. What does that mean?

He also told May that he may not contest for 2022 presidential election in USA.

How Trump has been treated in London?

 

Its always been hard to be in the trade partners country when you just labelled tariff on their goods. Not only trade but also his immigration and foreign policy is not liked by most of the Britishers out there hence Thousands of people are expected to attend demonstrations in London and other places to protest against his controversial approach to immigration, trade and foreign policy.

                          Immigration         –         Trade         –          Foreign Policy

These are the major concerns of protesters faced by Trump in London and due to which he has to stay caution while roaming around in restaurants the way he used to walk around in his previous trips

The final part of Mr Trump’s trip in Scotland will likely exacerbate anger, as it is believed he will spend a lot time playing golf, with British taxpayers covering the £5m cost of security.

Showcasing the UK’s military and its capabilities will form a key element of the trip for the UK, with the US defense secretary having recently questioned Britain’s ongoing commitment to maintaining world-class forces.

The visit will take in a lavish black-tie dinner at Blenheim Palace, near Oxford, a working lunch with Ms May at Chequers, and a meeting with the Queen at Windsor Castle, but only a brief overnight stay in London.

Asked whether the president’s schedule was designed to keep him away from possible protests, a Downing Street spokeswoman said: “We’re looking forward to making sure the president has a chance to see and experience the UK beyond London and the South-East.”

Donald Trump ‘considered invading Venezuela’, reports say

She added that it is normal for prime ministers to make use of Chequers when foreign leaders are visiting, with former presidents Richard Nixon, George Bush Senior and Junior having all visited the 16th-century manor house in Buckinghamshire.

But the majority of the trip being outside London, means it seems unlikely the president will come close enough to Westminster to see the “Trump baby” blimp protesters plan to fly over the houses of parliament, after receiving permission for the stunt from London mayor Sadiq Khan.

The Downing Street spokeswoman added: “As with any protest, we are a free and open democracy and we believe in the right to peaceful protest.

“But I would also say that I think the majority of British people understand the importance of the UK-US alliance.

“The presidential visit is an important moment to recognise our close and special relationship and to have good and frank discussions on the key issues.”

Mr Trump arrives in the UK on board Air Force One next Thursday afternoon, straight from the Nato summit in Brussels where he is expected to confront European allies over levels of defence

Trump corrects tweet boasting about his writing after it has spelling mistakes

The president and his wife Melania will then be guests of honour at a dinner for around 100 guests at Blenheim Palace, the birthplace of Sir Winston Churchill, a personal hero of the president.

The trip to the 18th-century country house, built for the first Duke of Marlborough as a reward for his military victories, will begin with a military ceremony in the Great Court of the Palace, where the bands of the Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards will play the Liberty Fanfare, Amazing Grace, and the National Emblem.

Later in the trip Ms May and Mr Trump will also visit an unnamed defence site to view a demonstration of UK military capabilities, with a strong stress on integrated UK-US training.

The focus on defence comes after Mr Trump appeared to be impressed with the French military parade he saw on Bastille Day while being hosted by Emmanuel Macron earlier this year.

Since then the two leaders have apparently formed a close relationship and earlier this week a leaked letter from the US defense secretary Jim Mattis suggested France could be the “partner of choice” for the US in international affairs in the future.

The Downing Street spokeswoman said: “In every aspect of our relationship, we are seeking to deepen our special relationship and defence is one of those, and security.

“Our armed forces have fought together for over a century and no two countries work closer together in defence co-operation and that element of the visit is a reflection of that.”

The dinner at Blenheim will be attended by the Prime Minister, with guests including leaders of UK business sectors including financial services, travel, creative industries, food and drink, engineering, tech, infrastructure, pharmaceuticals and defence.

Downing Street said it is intended to “celebrate the strong business links between our two countries” at a time when the UK is hoping to strike a free trade deal with the US following Brexit.